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Storm debris and leaf pickup update: December 10 -14.  Please note storm debris pickup and leaf pickup are two separate operations (DO NOT mix brush and leaves.) and are explained in this news article.

Our History

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Benjamin Robbins named the community "Centreville" after his hometown, Centreville, New Jersey, and because it was located between two rivers and central to other communities like Dayton and Lebanon. By 1900 the U. S. Post Office changed the spelling to Centerville.

Some log houses were soon replaced by stone homes. Limestone was readily available and used in about 100 buildings, about 30 of these homes are still standing. Centerville has the largest collection of early stone houses in the state of Ohio. They are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The older part of downtown Centerville is called the Architectural Preservation District, located near Main Street (State Route 48) and Franklin Street (State Route 725). This area reflects the "Main Street" downtown era that shaped American towns and cities in the early 1900s.

Many of the buildings in the APD were built prior to World War I and represent diverse architectural styles. The rich craftsmanship and detail make them a valuable asset to the Centerville community. The city is committed to preserving this unique area.

Centerville became a city on December 2, 1968. There are now about 23,700 people living in our city.

Centerville-Washington Historical Society

The Historical Society connects the community to its’ heritage by collecting, preserving, interpreting, and promoting the history of the City of Centerville and Washington Twp communities.

The Historical Society operates three local museums - the Walton House, the Aaron Nutt Cottage, and the Asahel Wright Community Center.

In addition, the Historical Society offers monthly programs and events, numerous publications about the area, and teacher resources. For more information, please go to the C-W Historical Society website or call 937-433-0123.